secondcoming

Nehemiah 6:15- So the wall was finished in the 25th day of the month Elul, in 52 days
Nehemiah 6:15 KJV "The wall was completed in 52 days, on the twenty-fifth day of the month Elul."

http://www.hebcal.com/converter/?gd=5&gm=9&gy=2018&g2h=1

  • Wed, 5 September 2018 = 25th of Elul, 5778

Completion of the Wall
14Remember, O my God, Tobiah and Sanballat according to these works of theirs, and also Noadiah the prophetess and the rest of the prophets who were trying to frighten me. 15So the wall was completed on the twenty-fifth of the month Elul, in fifty-two days.16When all our enemies heard of it, and all the nations surrounding us saw it, they lost their confidence; for they recognized that this work had been accomplished with the help of our God.…
Cross References
Nehemiah 4:1
Now it came about that when Sanballat heard that we were rebuilding the wall, he became furious and very angry and mocked the Jews.

Nehemiah 4:2
He spoke in the presence of his brothers and the wealthy men of Samaria and said, "What are these feeble Jews doing? Are they going to restore it for themselves? Can they offer sacrifices? Can they finish in a day? Can they revive the stones from the dusty rubble even the burned ones?"

Nehemiah 7:1
Now when the wall was rebuilt and I had set up the doors, and the gatekeepers and the singers and the Levites were appointed,
Treasury of Scripture

So the wall was finished in the twenty and fifth day of the month Elul, in fifty and two days.

wall

Ezra 6:15 And this house was finished on the third day of the month Adar, which …

Psalm 1:3 And he shall be like a tree planted by the rivers of water, that …

Daniel 9:25 Know therefore and understand…


Elul
 (Hebrew: אֱלוּל‬, Standard Elul Tiberian ʾĔlûl) is the twelfth month of the Jewish civil year and the sixthmonth of the ecclesiastical year on the Hebrew calendar. It is a summer month of 29 days. Elul usually occurs in August–September on the Gregorian calendar.

 Elul, is the key to unlocking the inner and most potent meaning of the heart. As is well known, the Hebrew letters that make the word “Elul,” aleph, lamed, vav and lamed, are an acronym for the phrase (from the biblical Song of Songs) ani l’dodi v’dodi li, which means “I am to my beloved and my beloved is to me.”

This beautiful and romantic phrase is that which represents our relationship with our Creator, which is often paralleled to that of a husband and wife, a bride and groom, in our individual lives.

The Zohar explains that at the beginning of Elul we are achor el achor, meaning “back to back,” and by the end of Elul we are panim el panim, “face to face.” But how can it be that we are back to back? Wouldn’t that imply that G‑d has His back turned to us as well? How can we say such a thing, when this is the month in which—as chassidic master Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi teaches us—“the King is in the field”? Is it not the month when G‑d is more accessible than ever, when He is waiting for us to greet Him, when He is there for us in the “field” of our everyday lives?

The fact that we are described as “back to back” and then “face to face” is an incredible lesson. Often, when we feel angry, hurt, abandoned, whatever the root of our pain may be, we turn our back. When our back is turned, we have no idea of the state of the other. And it is often easier to believe that we are not the only one with a turned back. It is easier to think the other also turned around, that the other isn’t facing us at all, because if that is the case, then even if we turn around it won’t help, so why bother. Why make that first move only to turn around and see the back of the other? http://www.chabad.org/theJewishWoman/article_cdo/aid/424441/jewish/The-Jewish-Heart.htm


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